Free Stained Glass Patterns plus How to Cut Stained Glass
Brought to you by Cole Farms, Inc.



Working with stained glass can be a fun hobby and in some cases a profitable business venture. You can make stained glass pieces for yourself or as gifts for your family and friends and you can even create pieces and sell them at craft fairs or over the internet via ebay or an online store. Many stained glass artisans make a good living creating medium to large stained glass panels for commericial buildings, churches and other public facilities.

After learning the art of creating stained glass you will no doubt want to start creating your own unique stained glass pieces. This process starts with locating a pattern. This website is designed to help you find the right stained glass pattern for the project you are working on. You are welcome to use, modify and copy these patterns for you own personal use or to create stained glass pieces to resell. We will continue to add to our collection.

Free Stained Glass Pattern Links and How to Cut Stained Glass Tile

This page is an index of our free stained glass stepping stone, stained glass panel and mosaic patterns. Also included at the bottom of the page is an article on how to cut glass and stained glass along with a video. The patterns are easily edited, enlarged, etc.. using graphic editing software like paint shop or photo shop. We hope you enjoy the selection we have provided.

Free Pattern Site One -Stained Glass Patterns Site One

Free Pattern Site Two -Stained Glass Patterns Site Two

Free Pattern Site Three -Stained Glass Patterns Site Three

Hummingbird Stained Glass Mosaic Pattern -Hummingbird Stained Glass Stepping Stone Patterns

Bear Stained Glass Mosaic Pattern -Bear Stained Glass Stepping Stone Patterns

Rose Roses Stained Glass Mosaic Pattern -Rose Stained Glass Stepping Stone Patterns

Sun Sunface Stained Glass Mosaic Pattern -Sun Sun face Stained Glass Stepping Stone Patterns

Hot Air Balloon Stained Glass Mosaic Pattern -Hot Air Balloon Stained Glass Stepping Stone Patterns

Pelican Stained Glass Mosaic Pattern -Pelican Stained Glass Stepping Stone Patterns

Butterfly Stained Glass Mosaic Pattern -Butterfly Stained Glass Stepping Stone Patterns

Dolphin Stained Glass Mosaic Pattern -Dolphin Stained Glass Stepping Stone Patterns

Train Stained Glass Mosaic Pattern -Train / Locomotive Stained Glass Stepping Stone Patterns

Fish & Duck Stained Glass Mosaic Pattern - Fish & Duck Stained Glass Stepping Stone Patterns

Horse Stained Glass Mosaic Pattern - Horse Horses Stained Glass Stepping Stone Patterns

Flower Stained Glass Mosaic Patterns - Flower / Flowers Stained Glass Stepping Stone Patterns

Snowflake Stained Glass Mosaic Patterns - Snow Flake Stained Glass Stepping Stone Patterns

Swan Stained Glass Mosaic Patterns - Swan Stained Glass Stepping Stone Patterns

Golfing Golf Bag Stained Glass Mosaic Patterns - Golf Golfer Stained Glass Stepping Stone Patterns

Angel Angels Stained Glass Mosaic Patterns - Angel Stained Glass Stepping Stone Patterns

More Angel Angels Stained Glass Mosaic Patterns - Angel Stained Glass Stepping Stone Patterns #2

Duck Stained Glass Mosaic Patterns - Duck Stained Glass Stepping Stone Patterns

Lighthouse Light house Stained Glass Mosaic Patterns - Lighthouse Stained Glass Stepping Stone Patterns

Whale Whales Stained Glass Mosaic Patterns - Blue Whale Stained Glass Stepping Stone Patterns

Tropical Fish Stained Glass Mosaic Patterns - Tropical Fish Stained Glass Stepping Stone Patterns

Catamaran Sail Boat Stained Glass Mosaic Patterns - Catamaran Sailboat Stained Glass Stepping Stone Patterns

More Sail Boat Sailing Stained Glass Mosaic Patterns - Sailboat & Sailing Stained Glass Stepping Stone Patterns #2

Whale Whales Orca Killer Whale Stained Glass Mosaic Patterns - Killer Whale Orca Whale Tail Stained Glass Stepping Stone Patterns

Dog or Wolf Howling at the Moon Stained Glass Mosaic Patterns - Three Moon Stained Glass Stepping Stone Patterns

Making Mosaics Guide Part One -Making and Selling Your Mosaics

Selling Mosaics Guide Part Two -Making and Selling Your Mosaics

Illustrated Online Guide on How to Make Mosaics -Online Guide to Making Stained Glass Mosaics



Informational Articles Page 1 - Informational Articles Page One
Informational Articles Page 2 - Informational Articles Page Two
Stained Glass Patterns and Modification Guide Page - Guide to Modifying Stained Glass Patterns
How to Make Soap from Scratch - Soap Making Guide and Recipes
Guide on How to Acid Stain your own floors - Informational Article on Acid Staining Cement or Concrete Floors

TIPS ON HOW TO CUT STAINED GLASS
Cutting your glass pieces
Lay your glass on your work surface front side up. The front is usually the smoothest or shiniest side. Place your pattern piece on the glass. If you are using patterned or textured glass make sure you mark which direction the pattern should go. Holding the pattern in place, trace around it with a felt-tip pen. Lift the pattern off the piece of glass and mark the corresponding piece number in the center of your glass piece so you will have an easy reference for later. Note: Always cut glass on the smooth side.

Scoring your glass: Stand in a comfortable position and hold the cutter like you would a pen remembering to keep it perpendicular to the glass. Starting at the edge of the glass closest to you, place your cutter head on the glass approximately 1/8" away from the edge. Apply light, even pressure to the cutter. Guide the head across the surface of the glass on the inside edge of your traced line and off to the other side of the glass. One even score is all you need. There is no need to rescore over your line or move your cutter back and forth while scoring. This can result in a bad breaking score and can also chip the wheel of your glass cutter.

When cutting out glass pieces it is best to start with your most difficult cut first and finish with the easiest cuts. Inside curves are the hardest to score and break, outside curves would rank second with straight lines being the easiest. The nature of glass is that a score will travel in a straight line to the nearest edge so it is best to score and break tricky curves a little at a time instead of all at once. Once you have practiced and understand the limitations of the glass, you will be able to score and break more extreme curves.

Look at your score line. If there are small flakes of glass popping up from the score line then you are applying too much pressure on the cutter. Try applying a little less pressure to your next score line. If you are not able to see where your score line should be then you are not applying enough pressure. A white score line is called a dry score in which case you would add oil to your cutter.

After scoring your glass, you will need to break it. First, make sure you are wearing safety goggles before attempting to break glass. There are two basic ways to break glass. You may use your running pliers, or breaker/grozer pliers. Always remember to break each score line right away before making the next score. Scoring over other score lines will quickly wear our your cutting wheel.

Extreme inside curves are impossible to break out with just one score. Score along the pattern line, but don't break this score yet. To relieve the inner tension of the glass make a shallow score near the edge of the glass and parallel to the pattern line. Break it out using breaker/grozer pliers. Continue this process until you have worked your way to your first score. If you have a bad break, retrace the pattern on a new piece of glass and try again.

To break glass with running pliers hold the glass with score side up. Place the pliers at the beginning of the score and match up the line on the top of the pliers with the score. Tighten the screw until it touches the lower jaws of the pliers, then loosen the screw a 1/4 turn. Gently squeeze the running pliers to run the score. If the score only runs part of the way, you can turn the glass around and repeat the process from the other end of the score line.

Breaking glass with breaker/grozers: Hold your glass in the hand that won't be holding the pliers. (If you are right handed, hold the glass in your left hand or vice versa.) Form a fist with your thumb on the top of the glass and your fist under it. Your knuckles should be adjacent to the score line. Place the breaker/grozers (with the flat jaw on top) directly across from your knuckles and parallel to the score line. Hold the glass firmly and apply even pressure while snapping up and away. Again, always remember to wear safety goggles when breaking glass.

If your glass breaks unevenly, clean up the edges with breaker/grozer pliers. With the flat jaw of the pliers facing up, grasp small pieces and snip them off. If the pieces are too small, hold the pliers at a 90 degree angle to the edge of the glass and drag the serrated jaw of the pliers across the edge. After you have cleaned up your pieces as best you can using the breaker/grozer pliers you will use your grinder to smooth the edges out to your satisfaction. Since you are using the pieces for a stepping stone and not for a standard stained glass piece you do not have to be quite as exact.






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